Criminal Justice (CJ) < Temple University (2023)

CJ0812. Criminal Behavior. 3 Credit Hours.

Although we like to think differently, committing crime is an extremely common human behavior. From the extremes of armed robbery or serial murder to the ordinary failure to declare income on tax returns or the tendency to speed on the highway, nearly everyone has broken the law and committed a crime at some point. Considering physiological, psychological and pharmacological factors, we explore the influences of family, peers and the effects of alcohol and drugs on the incidence of criminal behavior. And we examine how the urban and social environment encourages (or inhibits) opportunities to commit crime. NOTE: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed CJ0912.

Course Attributes: GB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ0852. Justice in America. 3 Credit Hours.

This course invites students to engage in an interdisciplinary examination of one of U.S. society's most enduring conflicts - the struggle to achieve an acceptable balance between state power to prevent and control crime, and the rights of individuals to be free from undue government coercion. Within the context of the structures and processes of the criminal justice system, students will investigate a select number of critical policy issues/problems, and ponder questions about the legitimacy of the criminal law method of social control. Against a brief introductory background to some of the major criminal justice policies and practices, students will have the opportunity to question their effectiveness, efficiency, and fairness, and to increase their skill in being able to articulate reasoned, logical, and evidence-based grounds for their conclusions and opinions. Key questions include: How well is society doing in its efforts to prevent/control crime? How do those efforts rate in terms of securing a just balance between the rights of individuals and the coercive powers of the government? Are we doing things right? Are we doing the right things? What improvements should be made? How can we know/decide? NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed CJ0952.

Course Attributes: GU, SI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ0853. Doing Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Justice agencies - the juvenile justice system, police, judges and juries in courts, and prisons - are expected to create justice in response to lawbreakers. These agencies, however, often operate under enormous political, cultural, social, organizational and economic pressures. Further, what citizens or local leaders sometimes want from these agencies may create challenges and temptations. Thus, just outcomes are sometimes elusive. Focusing on the period 1925-2025 and largely on Philadelphia data, students will explore conceptual frameworks in the sociology of law, research articles, movies, maps, Census data, historical documents and newspaper archives to help understand these outcomes. NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed CJ0953.

Course Attributes: GU, SI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ0912. Honors Criminal Behavior. 3 Credit Hours.

Although we like to think differently, committing crime is an extremely common human behavior. From the extremes of armed robbery or serial murder to the ordinary failure to declare income on tax returns or the tendency to speed on the highway, nearly everyone has broken the law and committed a crime at some point. Considering physiological, psychological and pharmacological factors, we explore the influences of family, peers and the effects of alcohol and drugs on the incidence of criminal behavior. And we examine how the urban and social environment encourages (or inhibits) opportunities to commit crime. (This is an Honors course.) NOTE: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed CJ0812.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: GB, HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ0952. Honors: Justice in America. 3 Credit Hours.

This course invites students to engage in an interdisciplinary examination of one of U.S. society's most enduring conflicts - the struggle to achieve an acceptable balance between state power to prevent and control crime, and the rights of individuals to be free from undue government coercion. Within the context of the structures and processes of the criminal justice system, students will investigate a select number of critical policy issues/problems, and ponder questions about the legitimacy of the criminal law method of social control. Against a brief introductory background to some of the major criminal justice policies and practices, students will have the opportunity to question their effectiveness, efficiency, and fairness, and to increase their skill in being able to articulate reasoned, logical, and evidence-based grounds for their conclusions and opinions. Key questions include: How well is society doing in its efforts to prevent/control crime? How do those efforts rate in terms of securing a just balance between the rights of individuals and the coercive powers of the government? Are we doing things right? Are we doing the right things? What improvements should be made? How can we know/decide? (This is an Honors course.) NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed CJ0852.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: GU, HO, SI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ0953. Honors: Doing Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Justice agencies - the juvenile justice system, police, judges and juries in courts, and prisons - are expected to create justice in response to lawbreakers. These agencies, however, often operate under enormous political, cultural, social, organizational and economic pressures. Further, what citizens or local leaders sometimes want from these agencies may create challenges and temptations. Thus, just outcomes are sometimes elusive. Focusing on the period 1925-2025 and largely on Philadelphia data, students will explore conceptual frameworks in the sociology of law, research articles, movies, maps, Census data, historical documents and newspaper archives to help understand these outcomes. (This is an Honors course.) NOTE: This course fulfills the U.S. Society (GU) requirement for students under GenEd and American Culture (AC) for students under Core. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed CJ0853.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: GU, HO, SI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ1001. Introduction to Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

This course, provides an overview of a broad range of ways of understanding "criminal justice" - as an academic discipline, a philosophical construct, and, most especially, a system and process defining a large-scale enterprise characterized by a complex and fascinating array of public and private agencies, laws, rules, theories, policies, practices, technologies, problems and controversies. Emphasis is placed upon a critical understanding of the key foundations [e.g., constitutions, statutes, case law, administrative rules], components [e.g., law enforcement, courts, corrections], processes [e.g., legislation, arrest, prosecution, conviction, sentencing, correctional intervention], and goals [e.g., due process, crime prevention and control, retribution, reparation] of the criminal justice system and, to a far lesser degree, related social control mechanisms such as mental health, juvenile, and civil justice systems. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Individual and Society (IN) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Course Attributes: IN

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ1002. Professional Development in Criminal Justice. 1 Credit Hour.

This one-credit seminar will focus on the various traditional and non-traditional career avenues that graduates of an undergraduate program in Criminal Justice can pursue. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have developed the skills necessary to effectively search for career opportunities and communicate professionally. Students will also develop an application-ready resume and will be well-prepared for networking and professional interviews. Because there is significant overlap in course content, students will receive credit for only one of these courses: CLA1002, CJ1002, ENG1801, HIST1012, NSCI1002, POLS1002, PSY1002, SOC1002.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ1901. Honors Introduction to Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Honors version of Criminal Justice 1001 (C050). NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Individual and Society (IN) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO, IN

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ2000. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics will be arranged each semester. Please consult with the instructor for more information.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

CJ2001. Introduction to Juvenile Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Study of the juvenile justice system, including its origins, and development and contemporary calls for reform. Topics include definition of juvenile delinquency, philosophy and procedures of the juvenile justice system. Processes and policies used to control juvenile offenders, correctional treatment of juveniles, and prevention and intervention strategies will also be discussed.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ2002. Victims in Society. 3 Credit Hours.

(Video) Criminal Justice: A Very Short Introduction | Julian V. Roberts

This course explores the problem of victimization - both general and criminal; the types of victims involved -- direct and indirect, and individual and collective; and the harms they sustain -- financial, physical and mental. It also examines the fairness and efficacy of a wide variety of preventive and reactive ways of dealing with it -- by society in general and by the criminal justice system in particular. Emphasis is upon data sets and research studies shedding light upon the levels, correlates, dynamics, and consequences of major forms of victimization, as a basis for critical assessment of victimization theory, as well as existing and potential laws, policies, programs, practices, and technologies for reducing its incidence and impact.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ2101. Introduction to Law Enforcement. 3 Credit Hours.

Explores major trends and issues in law enforcement. The history and contemporary operation of police organizations, as well as the legal framework within which they operate. Examines police behavior and attitudes, especially as they effect discretionary decision making, and issues such as police brutality and corruption.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ2201. Criminal Courts and Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Comprehensive introduction to the U.S. criminal court system including the structure and administration of federal and state court systems. The course focuses on several significant stages in the criminal process, including decision to charge, pretrial release, preliminary hearings, the grand jury, jury trials, and sentencing. Examines the roles of the prosecutor, defense attorney, judge, and victim. The course contrasts the popular image with the reality of the court system.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ2301. Introduction to Corrections. 3 Credit Hours.

An overview of sentencing, punishment, and treatment of convicted offenders. Beginning with sentencing, the course explores the options for dealing with convicted persons, including institutional and community dispositions.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ2304. Ethics, Crime, and Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Police brutality, prosecutorial misconduct, prison guards who look the other way when rules are violated: these are just a few examples of ethical choices that undermine the public trust in the Criminal Justice System. This course will examine the meaning of ethics and its importance in modern society. Ethical decision making systems and theories will also be explored in detail. In addition the course will examine examples of ethical misconduct and the responses by the criminal justice system, in the context of three main arenas: law enforcement, lawyers and corrections. Finally, students will learn to apply these decision making systems to ethical dilemmas, as they develop an understanding of the factors that influence the criminal justice professional's decisions in real life verses theory.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ2401. Nature of Crime. 3 Credit Hours.

Overview of the various theories explaining crime and deviance. Emphasis on understanding the wide range of theoretical perspectives on crime and criminals, and how these theories impact criminal justice policy and treatment of offenders.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ2501. Introduction to Criminal Law. 3 Credit Hours.

Study of the general principles of substantive criminal law. Topics include the American legal system and appellate process; nature, origin and purposes of criminal law; constitutional limits on criminal law; elements of crime - actus reus, mens rea, causation; and defenses to charges of crime. The course emphasizes the application of legal rules to solve hypothetical and real life legal problems.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ2597. Criminal Justice Research Methods. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduces the scientific method and research designs including qualitative field methods, survey research, experiments, and quasi-experiments. Evaluation of research quality and synthesis of research evidence related to criminal justice issues emphasized. Special attention devoted to research problems often salient when researching criminal justice topics. Students who have taken CJ 2601 will not earn additional credit for CJ2597.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites: Minimum grade of C- in CJ1001.

CJ2602. Criminal Justice Statistics. 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to basic statistical methods and their application to criminal justice data. Covers both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, and basic hypothesis testing. NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Quantitative Reasoning B (QB) requirement. Although it may be used towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information. (Prior to spring 2017, the course title was "Criminal Justice Research and Analysis.")

Course Attributes: QB

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites: Minimum grade of C- in CJ1001 and CJ2597.

CJ2701. Inside-Out Prison Exchange. 3 Credit Hours.

The "Inside-Out" Prison Exchange Program is an opportunity for a small group of Temple students to go behind the walls of an area prison or jail to take a course with a comparable number of residents of the correctional facility. Using a unique pedagogical approach, approximately 15 "inside" students and 15 "outside" students (from Temple) meet for class once a week to explore issues of crime and justice, the criminal justice system, corrections and imprisonment. These topics are examined in depth, through an ongoing facilitated dialogue involving all participants, both in small groups and in the full class. There are numerous texts for the course, as well as several reflective/analytical assignments throughout the semester. Additionally, students work on a project together towards the end of the semester, developing solutions to the problems examined during the term. The course offers a chance for all participants to gain a deeper understanding of the criminal justice system through the marriage of theoretical knowledge and practical experience achieved by weekly meetings throughout the semester inside the facility.

Course Attributes: SI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3000. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics will be arranged each semester. Please consult with the instructor for more information.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

CJ3002. Drugs, Crime, and Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the role that drugs play in the U.S. criminal justice system. Topics covered include the history of drug prohibition in the U.S.; the types of illegal drugs currently available in the United States; patterns, trends, and scope of illicit drug use; consideration of the relationship between drugs and crime; and manifestations and consequences of the criminal justice system response. The course includes hands-on experimental learning including site visits to locations such as drug court and rehabilitation programs. Note: This course was previously known as CJ 4002 or 4902. Students who have already received credit for this topic under those numbers will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3003. Race and Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Study of the social, cultural, economic, psychological, and political factors associated with race and crime in the United States. This course examines the real and perceived relationship between race/ethnicity and criminal activity, as well as the impact of both personal and institutional racism on the criminal justice system. NOTE: This course was formerly taught as "Urban Minorities and the Criminal Justice System." Students who received credit under the prior title will not receive additional credit because the content overlaps significantly. This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information. Note also that this course existed previously under the course number of CJ 4003. Students who have already received credit for this topic under that number will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Course Attributes: SI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3004. Women and Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Examination of historic and contemporary treatment of women involved in the criminal justice system as offenders, victims of crime, and workers and criminal justice professions. Specific topics may include criminological theories of women's crime, prostitution, infanticide, women's prisons, sexual offenses, domestic violence, and women's experience in policing, corrections, and law. Note that this course was formerly known as CJ 4004. Students who have already received credit for this topic under that number will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Course Attributes: SI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

(Video) Institutional racism and the criminal justice system

CJ3005. Historical Roots of Urban Crime. 3 Credit Hours.

The historical development of organized crime (gambling, prostitution, narcotics, and bootlegging), professional theft, juvenile delinquency, and deviant subcultures in American cities since the Civil War. The development of criminal justice institutions, especially police, and their relationship to criminal activity. NOTE: Prior background in history or criminal justice preferred, but not required. Please also know that this course was formerly known as CJ 4005. Students who have already received credit for this topic under that number will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3006. Crime and Justice Around the World. 3 Credit Hours.

Philosophies, practices, and institutions of criminal justice in other countries. Crime & Justice Around the World was formerly known as CJ 4006 Comparative Criminal Justice. Students who have already received credit for CJ 4006 will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic as CJ3006 Crime & Justice Around the World for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3007. Cybercrime. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the criminal activity that occurs in cyberspace, the criminal actors that operate and organize in this space, the various criminological theoretical explanations for their crimes, and how policing and legal bodies are managing these crimes and criminals. Emphasis is on how communication technologies (e.g., computers and related networking technologies) can be targets of crime, instruments of crime, and important sources of criminal evidence. Students in this class will examine how cybercrime occurs along a continuum of technical expertise and physical-cyber operations. Students will also engage in practical experiential learning projects that emphasize everyday safe cyber-hygiene. Note: This course was formerly known as CJ 4007 and CJ3007 Computer Crime. Students who have already received credit for this topic under the prior course number or former title will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic/title under this new course number or title for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3101. Police Organization and Management. 3 Credit Hours.

Historical and contemporary management practices as applied to law enforcement organizations are examined, with particular concern for assessing police management accountability. Theories of organization and management are examined with regard to the police role and the efficient and effective provision of law enforcement services to the community.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites: Minimum grade of C- in CJ2101.

CJ3102. Community and Crime Prevention. 3 Credit Hours.

Course links features of community and individuals with different responses to crime and disorder, including individual and community prevention efforts. Examines causes of fear of crime, impacts of neighborhood features on reactions to crime, and types of prevention efforts mounted in different types of neighborhoods. The course emphasizes the links among individuals, community context, and psychological and behavioral reactions to disorder. Note that this course was formerly known as CJ 4102. Students who have already received credit for this topic under that number will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3201. The American Jury System. 3 Credit Hours.

Examination of the role of the jury within the larger context of the criminal justice system. Explores the origins of the concept of "trial by jury" in an historical and philosophical context. Analyzes obstacles to definitions and operationalization of the notion of a "trial by jury of one's peers." Discusses contribution of juries to attainment of criminal justice system goals and critiques suggestions for jury reform.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3301. Community Corrections. 3 Credit Hours.

Various dimensions of community corrections, including the effect of the community on the formation of correctional policy, as well as the numerous intermediate sanctions (community corrections) available on the continuum between probation and incarceration. Analysis of correctional policy making. Topics include probation, parole, electronic monitoring, day reporting centers, boot camps, and many other sentencing options.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3302. Prisons in America. 3 Credit Hours.

Focus on development, current state of, and issues related to the U.S. prison system. Examination of the reality of the prison experience. Analysis of the system's efficacy and strategies for prison reform. Topics include prison life and culture, correctional management, the history of incarceration, and AIDS, drugs, sexual activity, and prison privatization.

Course Attributes: SI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3303. Rehabilitation of the Offender. 3 Credit Hours.

Community and institutional correctional interventions are considered, examination of various treatments for certain kinds of offenders, problems in providing services in correctional settings, and research findings on the effectiveness of correctional interventions. NOTE: This course was formerly numbered CJ 2302 under the same title. Students who have earned credits for CJ 2302 will not receive additional credit for CJ3303. Students who earned a low grade in CJ 2302 may take CJ3303 to improve their grade point average.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3304. Capital Punishment. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the highly controversial subject of the death penalty. The history of capital punishment in America and the types of offenses to which it has been applied; arguments for and against its use; its status in current legislation; significant cases; the current death row population and the likelihood of execution; public attitudes toward capital punishment; and the moral issues it raises. Note that this course was formerly known as CJ 4301. Students who have already received credit for this topic under that number will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3401. White Collar Crime. 3 Credit Hours.

The continued rate of white-collar offending in the U.S. has presented many significant and unique issues for criminological theory and the criminal justice system. This course will expose students to the nature, extent, and costs of white-collar crime. Students in this course will explore contemporary forms of white-collar crime through reported legal cases, case studies, and other materials to investigate the complexities of this form of criminal offending. The course will also delve into the problems of detection and punishment and the causes of this social problem, including discussions of policy evaluation and suggested reforms. Note: This course description changed in summer I, 2020. Students who have taken White Collar Crime in prior semesters should not repeat this course; no additional credit will be given.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3402. Street-Level Criminology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces a set of crime theories that emphasize the role of the built environment in shaping human behavior and consequently where crime happens. The basic question asked in environmental criminology is why crime occurs where it does. Theoretical frameworks used to explore this question include: behavioral geography, routine activities, crime pattern theory, rational choice and human territorial functioning. In addition, various crime prevention strategies are examined such as situational crime prevention, CPTED, and defensible space. Note: This course was formerly known as "Environmental Criminology." Students who received credit under the prior title will not receive additional credit because the content overlaps significantly.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites: Minimum grade of C- in CJ2401.

CJ3403. Organized Crime. 3 Credit Hours.

(Video) Criminal Justice Degree: Worth It?

Analysis of definitional issues and methodological problems in the study of organized crime. This course studies a variety of organized criminal activities on the local, national and international level. It explores of the origins, opportunity, motives for criminal enterprises and examines the interconnections between organized criminals and legitimate organizations. Legislative and policy responses are investigated.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3404. Urban Crime Patterns. 3 Credit Hours.

The spatial variation of crime is analyzed at three levels. Cultural variables are used to explain crime in regions of the United States within which the cities are located. Economic base is used to explain variation in crime between cities. Finally, housing and income segregation are used to explain the spatial variation of crime within a city. Much of the course focuses on Philadelphia.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3405. Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Global Security. 3 Credit Hours.

Acts of terrorism can include crimes committed to disrupt governments, change political will, instigate religious furor, and impose a transformation by violent means. These actions can interrupt or damage critical infrastructure, cause fear amongst citizens and require governments to expend huge resources and efforts to marginalize the effect of terrorist acts or prevent them from occurring. This course will address the causes and consequences of terrorism and transnational crime; the interaction between terrorist groups, other criminal elements such as organized crime and other entities that provide material support to these groups; the mechanisms employed by global organizations to conduct terrorist acts; and how dealing with terrorist events has changed the global concept of security and its implications on the rule of law.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3406. Youth and Crime. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of key issues associated with youth and crime in the United States, and the educational, social, and cultural efforts to reduce youth involvement with guns, drugs, and gangs. Emphasis will be on the nature and structure of youth gangs, drug use by juveniles, and risk factors associated with youth violence. Other issues may involve curfews, gun violence, victims of youth violence, and the over-representation of minority youth in the juvenile justice system. Note that this course was formerly known as CJ 4401. Students who have already received credit for this topic under that number will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Course Attributes: SI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3407. Violence, Crime, and Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Exploration of violence in its diverse aspects as well as collective and individual questions about its nature and causes. Of particular interest are definitions of violence: when is violence criminal, when is it political? In addition to discussion of the causes of violence, emphasis will be placed on society's response to violent acts. Note that this course was formerly known as CJ 4402. Students who have already received credit for this topic under that number will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3408. Forensic Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

The contribution of psychology to our understanding of various aspects of, and decisions within, the criminal justice process. The psychological implications of criminal behavior, criminal justice decision-making, jury selection, witness recall, sentencing, prisonization, and correctional treatment. Note that this course was formerly known as CJ 4403 and CJ 4903. Students who have already received credit for this topic under those numbers will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish. Please also be advised that this course was previously titled "Psychology and Criminal Justice"; students who received credit under that title will not receive additional credit for this course.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3409. Criminal Gangs. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the modern urban street gang and specialty gangs (e.g. outlaw biker gangs, skinhead groups, etc.) by investigating the extensive history of theory and research on gangs. The first half of the course will attempt to answer such questions as: What is a gang? How does one differentiate between the different types of gang? Why do individuals join gangs? The second half of the course will focus on the law enforcement and community response to gangs with a heavy emphasis on comparing and contrasting a variety of "evidence-based" models of gang prevention and intervention.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3501. Criminal Procedure: Police Phase. 3 Credit Hours.

In depth exploration of the law of criminal procedure applicable to the police phase of the criminal process, based primarily on reading and analysis of Supreme Court opinions establishing the legal rules that govern searches and seizures, arrests, interrogation, identification procedures, investigating grand juries, and entrapment. The course includes investigation of the historical roots of the "Bill of Rights" and study of the process by which criminal procedure became constitutionalized. Emphasis is on application of legal rules to real and hypothetical situations and critical analysis of rules' impact on the criminal justice system. Note: This course was formerly known as "Criminal Procedure: Law Enforcement Practices and Procedures." Students who received credit under the prior title will not receive additional credit because the content overlaps significantly.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3502. Criminal Procedure: Prosecution & Adjudication. 3 Credit Hours.

The legal principles governing the post-investigation phase of the criminal justice process: bail, pretrial detention, arraignment, preliminary hearings, guilty pleas, right to counsel, speedy trial, double jeopardy, and the right to trial by jury, including practical impact of these rules on the criminal justice system. Law and legal issues are examined primarily through study of U.S. Supreme Court cases.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites: Minimum grade of C- in CJ2501.

CJ3503. Sex Crimes and the Law. 3 Credit Hours.

An exploration of the definition and nature of sexual crimes, the experiences of victims of sexual violence, and the criminal justice system and community response to sex crime offenders. Note that this course was formerly known as CJ 4501. Students who have already received credit for this topic under that number will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3504. Hate Crimes. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on hate crime as a specific type of crime as well as a social problem connected to strained intergroup relations, discrimination, the politics of lawmaking and enforcement, and social control more generally. The purpose of this course is to examine the causes, manifestations, and consequences of hate crimes, as well as the larger social context in which they occur and get reacted to in both legal and extra-legal ways.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3505. Restorative Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

Many individuals view our criminal justice system as being in a state of crisis, pointing to issues such as overcrowded prisons, poor treatment of victims, the school to prison pipeline, and racial, economic and geographic inequalities. Restorative justice offers a different approach, focused mainly on repairing the harms caused by crimes for victims, offenders, and the community. In this course, we will try to imagine what a justice system based on the principles of restorative justice would look like. We will begin our journey by exploring the historical development of restorative justice practices and theories. We will also review the underlying principles that guide restorative justice programs, thinking critically about where those ideas fit into current methods across the country. And finally, students will assess the pros and cons of a few examples of restorative justice programs at local, state and national levels.

Course Attributes: SI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3506. Cyber-Investigations, Digital Forensics, and the Law. 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the impact of rapidly evolving technology on criminality and the response of the criminal justice system. Cybercrime will be examined through the lens of evolving law enforcement techniques, and the response of the courts to many of the new ideas that are continually presenting themselves, such as encryption, the expanding range of personal information that is digitally stored, shifting perceptions of expectations of privacy, and the challenges presented by remote data storage and the resulting difficulties in the service of legal process. Focal points will include law enforcement response to crimes on the internet, the capabilities and limitations of digital and network forensics, and legal issues that have developed as a result of the dynamic landscape of the digital environment.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3602. Evidence-Based Policing. 3 Credit Hours.

Policing is often described as a craft; however, science is increasingly playing a role is operational law enforcement. This course traces the origins and principles of evidence-based policy-making, and how these ideas have helped define evidence-based policing (EBP). It also provides an overview of research methods and research design relevant to EBP and how these have examined a variety of policing issues. We will explore the challenges of science knowledge translation and the conflicts between policing as a science and as a craft. The course will help students understand what is necessary to develop and use scientific research evidence to strategically guide law enforcement practice.

(Video) Highest Paying Jobs For Criminal Justice Majors! (Top 10)

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3603. Mapping Crime and Justice Data. 3 Credit Hours.

Why do some streets have more drug deals than others? Is travel distance a barrier to successfully completing probation? Can locating more after-school programs in particular neighborhoods reduce juvenile delinquency in a city? This course uses geographic information systems (GIS) to address questions like these as well as to disentangle criminal justice-related problems and inform criminal justice policy.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3701. Land Management and Federal Law Enforcement. 3 Credit Hours.

This course offers a broad introduction to the history, operation and governing laws of the United States Public Lands System as well as a more detailed examination of several federal government agencies with law enforcement divisions, namely, the National Park Service (NPS), the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), that are responsible for providing visitor and resource protection in areas that are or have been owned or administered by the federal government. Several themes underpinning the course include: the discretionary prerogatives of law enforcement branches of land management agencies, the scope of federal and state authority and jurisdiction on public lands and their regulating mechanisms (i.e., law/policy, markets, norms, architecture), the significance of enabling legislation for the stewardship of cultural, natural and historical resources, and the issues and challenges inherent in the protection, conservation and preservation of vast public lands and resources.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3901. Honors Issues in Criminal Procedure. 3 Credit Hours.

Students in this class will get a "taste of law school" while studying the constitutional law that governs the police phase of the criminal process. Students will learn what police can and cannot do when they initiate an encounter with a citizen, search the citizen's person or property, and seek to obtain a confession. The rules that have developed are the result of a constant tension between safeguarding our personal liberty and protecting public safety. By exploring the impact of these rules on real and hypothetical situations, students will critically analyze and debate the balance that the Supreme Court has established in this on-going conflict. Students will also learn about the Supreme Court; the historical roots of the Bill or Rights and the process by which the law of criminal procedure became constitutionalized; and how to find, read, and analyze U.S. Supreme Court decisions.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3902. Honors: Street-Level Criminology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces a set of crime theories that emphasize the role of the built environment in shaping human behavior and consequently where crime happens. The basic question asked in environmental criminology is why crime occurs where it does. Theoretical frameworks used to explore this question include: behavioral geography, routine activities, crime pattern theory, rational choice and human territorial functioning. In addition, various crime prevention strategies are examined such as situational crime prevention, CPTED, and defensible space. (Students who have received credit under the former title of this course, Honors Environmental Criminology, will not earn additional credit for taking this course.)

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3903. Honors Forensic Psychology. 3 Credit Hours.

The contribution of psychology to our understanding of various aspects of, and decisions within, the criminal justice process. The psychological implications of criminal behavior, criminal justice decision-making, jury selection, witness recall, sentencing, prisonization, and correctional treatment. Note that this course was formerly known as CJ 4403 and CJ 4903. Students who have already received credit for this topic under those numbers will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish. Please also be advised that this course was previously titled "Honors: Psychology and Criminal Justice"; students who received credit under that title will not receive additional credit for this course.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ3904. Honors: Drugs, Crime, and Criminal Justice. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the role that drugs play in the U.S. criminal justice system. Topics covered include the history of drug prohibition in the U.S.; the types of illegal drugs currently available in the United States; patterns, trends, and scope of illicit drug use; consideration of the relationship between drugs and crime; and manifestations and consequences of the criminal justice system response. The course includes hands-on experimental learning including site visits to locations such as drug court and rehabilitation programs. Note: This course was previously known as CJ 4002 and CJ 4902. Students who have already received credit for this topic under those numbers will not receive additional credit but can repeat the topic under this new course number for a better grade if they wish.

Cohort Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Cohorts: SCHONORS, UHONORS, UHONORSTR.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ4075. Criminal Justice Internship Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

Mandatory weekly seminar to be taken in conjunction with field service internship with law enforcement and other criminal justice agencies, rehabilitation and prevention programs, and community organizations dealing with the crime problem. Students who have earned credits for CJ Internship Seminar (CJ 4077) will not be permitted to earn additional credits in CJ4075. Must be taken with CJ4085.

Co-requisites: CJ4085.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ4082. Independent Study. 3 Credit Hours.

For students wishing to engage in intensive study of a specific topic in consultation with a faculty member. Not intended to be a substitute for any required course. The student and faculty member must enter into an agreement regarding the content and requirements, including readings, meetings, and papers. NOTE: The agreement must be filed in the department office before the end of the first two weeks of the semester.

Repeatability: This course may be repeated for additional credit.

CJ4085. Criminal Justice Internship. 1 to 9 Credit Hour.

Field Service Training is provided with law enforcement and other criminal justice agencies, rehabilitation and prevention programs, and community organizations dealing with the crime problem. Allows a student to clarify career interests, synthesize prior knowledge from the classroom with direct experience, critically examine the criminal justice system in operation, and sharpen analytic and observational skills. NOTE: Students must complete 50 hours of work at their placement for each credit they take, for example a 4 credit internship requires 200 hours at the placement site. NOTE: Enrollment requires permission from the Instructor. Students who have earned credits for CJ Practicum (CJ 4087) will not be permitted to earn additional credits in CJ4085. Must be taken with CJ4075.

Co-requisites: CJ4075.

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

CJ4097. CJ Capstone Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

This topical seminar focuses on a broad topic of interest within Criminal Justice. The specific content will vary with individual instructors. This is a writing-intensive course designed to integrate knowledge and critical thinking skills developed in the major. Each seminar will focus upon analysis and synthesis of scholarly sources, culminating in an independent research paper. This course is required for all CJ majors and must be taken during the senior year.

Field of Study Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Fields of study: Criminal Justice.
Class Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Classes: Junior 60 to 89 Credits, Senior 90 to 119 Credits, Senior/Fifth Year 120+ Credits.

Course Attributes: WI

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

Pre-requisites: Minimum grade of C- in CJ1001, CJ2401, CJ2501, and CJ2602.

CJ4941. Honors Youth and Crime. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of key issues associated with youth and crime in the United States, and the educational, social, and cultural efforts to reduce youth involvement with guns, drugs, and gangs. Emphasis will be on the nature and structure of youth gangs, drug use by juveniles, and risk factors associated with youth violence. Other issues may include curfews, gun violence, victims of youth violence, and the over-representation of minority youth in the juvenile justice system.

Course Attributes: HO

Repeatability: This course may not be repeated for additional credits.

(Video) Racial disparities in the criminal justice system

FAQs

Does Temple University have a criminal justice program? ›

Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice. Learn how the criminal justice system works with the Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice in the College of Liberal Arts at Temple University. You'll form a deep understanding of its complex history, policies and societal implications.

Is criminal justice a good major? ›

A criminal justice major is an excellent choice, especially if you're interested in criminal justice jobs in areas like law enforcement, prison reform and the judicial system. To help you understand what makes criminal justice a valuable major, let's take a closer look at this fascinating area of study.

Is USC a good school for criminal justice? ›

The criminology and criminal justice doctoral program is ranked among the Top 25 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.

Does USC have criminal justice major? ›

USC Bovard College's Master of Science in Criminal Justice is designed to prepare professionals working in the criminal justice field to advance in their careers. If you're ready to take the next step toward your professional success, we're here to answer your questions and guide you through the admissions process.

What major is Temple known for? ›

The most popular majors at Temple University include: Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services; Communication, Journalism, and Related Programs; Health Professions and Related Programs; Visual and Performing Arts; Biological and Biomedical Sciences; Psychology; Computer and Information Sciences and ...

How long is Law School at Temple? ›

The program requires three full academic years to complete and acceleration is not permitted. Classes and activities extend throughout the entire day, Monday through Friday. Full-time students are classified as first-year, second-year, or third-year full-time students.

Can criminal justice be a lawyer? ›

Studying criminal justice can give you a strong foundation for law, but if you want to become a lawyer, you will need to attend law school, take the bar exam, and be licensed by a state bar association. You don't need to study a specific college major to get into law school.

What is the best degree to get in criminal justice? ›

10 criminal justice majors
  1. Corrections major. As corrections majors, students study prison life and prepare for roles in prison and jail facilities. ...
  2. Criminology major. ...
  3. Forensic science major. ...
  4. Police science major. ...
  5. Pre-law and legal major. ...
  6. Criminal justice major. ...
  7. Sociology major. ...
  8. Criminal psychology major.

What is the best college for a criminal justice degree? ›

Here are the best colleges with a Criminal Justice Major
  • Princeton University.
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  • Harvard University.
  • Stanford University.
  • Yale University.
  • University of Chicago.
  • Johns Hopkins University.
  • University of Pennsylvania.

What are the top 3 majors at USC? ›

The most popular majors at University of Southern California include: Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services; Social Sciences; Visual and Performing Arts; Communication, Journalism, and Related Programs; Engineering; Multi/Interdisciplinary Studies; Computer and Information Sciences and Support ...

What University of California has the best criminal justice program? ›

San Diego State University (SDSU)

Located in its School of Public Affairs, SDSU offers one of the best criminal justice majors in California. The school was established in 1897 and is the third-oldest university in the California State University System.

What is a good GPA to get into USC? ›

You should also have a 3.79 GPA or higher. If your GPA is lower than this, you need to compensate with a higher SAT/ACT score. For a school as selective as USC, you'll also need to impress them with the rest of your application. We'll cover those details next.

What is the difference between criminology and criminal justice? ›

While criminal justice studies the law enforcement system and operations, criminology focuses on the sociological and psychological behaviors of criminals to determine why they commit crimes.

What job can I get if I study criminology? ›

Career options for Criminology graduates
  • Community worker.
  • Correctional officer.
  • Crime analyst.
  • Crime scene technician.
  • Criminologist.
  • Detective.
  • Government officer.
  • Immigration officer.

What is USC famous for academically? ›

USC's highest-ranked undergraduate programs include Game/Simulation Development (1), Real Estate (7), Accounting (9), International Business (12), and Engineering (31).

Is Temple an Ivy League school? ›

No, there are no Ivy League schools in California. All eight Ivy League schools are based in the Northeast in states like Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.

What GPA do u need to get into Temple? ›

We're looking for students who are serious about academics, with at least a B average in high school classes and in the GPA 3.0 range for college-prep courses. The average high school GPA for the fall 2022 incoming class was 3.42​.

What is temples average GPA? ›

Average GPA: 3.54

The average GPA at Temple University is 3.54. This makes Temple University Strongly Competitive for GPAs. (Most schools use a weighted GPA out of 4.0, though some report an unweighted GPA.

How many hours do you sleep in law school? ›

Prioritize Sleep as Part of Your Schedule

Set a bed time that you feel is healthy and right for you and stick to it; make sure you are scheduling a minimum of 7 hours a night. Eight hours is even better.

What LSAT score do I need for Temple? ›

Temple Law School does not have a minimum LSAT requirement.

Is Temple Law School hard to get into? ›

With an acceptance rate of 36.05%, Temple Law is moderately difficult to get into. The class of 2023 had a median LSAT score of 161 and a median undergraduate GPA of 3.57.
...
US News Ranking History.
YearUS News Rank
202048
201947
201853
201750
32 more rows

Is criminal justice degree hard? ›

Is a Criminal Justice Major Hard? Like any accredited college program, earning a criminal justice degree requires rigor and persistence. Criminal justice coursework covers a broad set of topics in order to prepare students for a multi-faceted career. Criminal justice majors also typically require field training.

Is the bar exam hard? ›

Is The Bar Exam Hard? Administered nationwide across all states and U.S. territories, the bar exam is widely known to be a test with an extremely high degree of difficulty. For first time test takers, the nationwide pass rate for the bar exam recently climbed to 79.64%.

Is criminal law hard? ›

Criminal law is tough—but if you're willing to rise to the challenge, you'll be hard-pressed to find a more exciting, diverse, or thought-provoking legal career.

What field in criminal justice pays the most? ›

Here, you will find some of the highest paying criminal justice jobs available.
  • #1 – Judge and Hearing Officers. Median Annual Salary: $128,710. ...
  • #2 – Attorney or Lawyer. ...
  • #3 – FBI Specialist. ...
  • #4 – FBI Agent. ...
  • #5 – Criminologist. ...
  • #6 – Financial Examiner. ...
  • #7 – Intelligence Analyst. ...
  • #8 – Forensic Psychologist.

Is criminal justice a good major for FBI? ›

A criminal justice degree is ideal for a role in the FBI as a violent crime analyst, a profiler, or in a related area of criminal investigation within the FBI. It is also a good choice for individuals who want to work as field agents.

Is criminology or criminal justice a better major? ›

Both criminology and criminal justice are important fields, but they serve different purposes. If students want to work in research or policy, they should study criminology. If learners want to work in law enforcement or the legal system, they should study criminal justice.

What college degree is preferred by the FBI? ›

All FBI agents must hold a bachelor's degree at minimum, and many possess a master's degree or higher. FBI agents often earn degrees in fields such as criminal justice or political science, though the Bureau does not maintain any specific academic major requirements for applicants.

Should I major in criminal justice or psychology? ›

Criminal justice majors tend to work more in law enforcement and prevention, while psychology majors focus on the psychological precursors to or after effects of crime. There are benefits to each type of major and the related jobs, so deciding between the majors may come down to personal preference.

Is criminal justice in college easy? ›

Criminal justice is viewed as a non-rigorous program. In most schools, there is not a lot of reading, writing, and critical thinking within the program. It's possible to make it a rigorous program by beefing up courses and requirements, but many schools don't want to do that.

What is the average GPA for USC? ›

Average GPA: 3.79

The average GPA at USC is 3.79. This makes USC Strongly Competitive for GPAs. (Most schools use a weighted GPA out of 4.0, though some report an unweighted GPA.

What is USC most famous for? ›

USC is also well known for its Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism and its highly esteemed School of Cinematic Arts, which has graduated students such as directors Judd Apatow and George Lucas. Films including "The Graduate," "Legally Blonde" and "Forrest Gump" all filmed scenes on USC's campus.

What kind of students get into USC? ›

For the fall 2022 class, the 25th/75th percentile high school GPA range was 3.82-4.0. This means that the majority of admitted applicants had relatively strong grades, getting mostly or all As and possibly a few Bs. If your GPA is below 3.8, you'll most likely have a more difficult time getting into USC.

What is the best college for FBI agent California? ›

California State University has a School of Criminal Justice and Criminalistics, which is considered among the best schools for FBI agents. Many of the school graduates have succeeded in securing a good position at various law enforcement agencies.

What is the number one law school in California? ›

Here are the Best Law Schools in California
  • Stanford University.
  • University of California--Berkeley.
  • University of California--Los Angeles.
  • University of Southern California (Gould)
  • University of California--Davis.
  • University of California--Irvine.
  • University of California (Hastings)
  • Pepperdine University (Caruso)

What college degree is best for law enforcement? ›

Criminal justice is one of the best degree options for people in law enforcement because it directly addresses relevant topics. When you get a degree in criminal justice, your studies will almost exclusively focus on topics that you will use on a daily basis as a law enforcement officer.

What is the lowest GPA that USC has accepted? ›

Although the school does not have a minimum GPA requirement, USC wants students who rank in the top 10% of their class. To keep in line with that standard, students should try to have a GPA of at least 3.79, if not better.

What GPA do you need for Harvard? ›

It is tough to get into Harvard. The university receives applications from more qualified applicants than they can accept, and most applicants have at least a 4.18GPA. Meeting GPA and SAT/ACT requirements (although these are now optional) will help you get through the first round of filters.

What is the lowest GPA accepted at USC? ›

USC does not have a university-wide minimum GPA requirement for graduate admission eligibility.

Is criminology or criminal justice better for FBI? ›

Is Criminal Justice the Best Degree for FBI? Because of the perception that FBI recruiters always want to see candidates with criminology degrees, aspiring agents tend to flock to highly ranked colleges with criminal justice programs.

Is criminal justice or forensic science better? ›

It is readily apparent that a degree in criminal justice is more focused on the theory of crime, prevention, and its repercussions on society, while forensic science maintains an emphasis on the physical remnants of crime and their importance as evidence.

Is criminal justice and criminology a good degree? ›

Criminal Justice and Criminology is recognised by Skills for Justice (the skills and standard-setting body for the justice sector) as providing education of outstanding quality and relevance. You gain the skills needed for careers in the criminal justice professions in the public and private sectors.

Is a career in criminology worth it? ›

With this in mind, a degree in criminology can lead to plenty of job opportunities, with over 3.95 million graduates currently in the workforce (Data USA, 2021). It can lead to a career path in law enforcement, such as that of an FBI agent, forensic analyst, criminal investigator, or even a social worker.

How many years does it take to study criminology? ›

How long does it take to major in criminology? The short answer is a full-time student will finish a Bachelor of Arts in Criminology in four years.

Can criminology get you into law? ›

Criminology and Law students are highly valued by employers due to their broad skillset and knowledge base. This degree combination leads naturally to a career in criminal law. If you major in law, you could pursue a career as a solicitor, barrister, legal adviser, legal executive or paralegal.

Is USC like an Ivy League? ›

USC, UCLA, and Stanford are among the most prestigious universities outside the Ivy League. These top universities have challenging classes, distinguished professors, competitive acceptance rates, and distinguished alumni networks like their Ivy League counterparts.

Is USC or UCLA better? ›

When it comes to ranking, the rankings clearing indicate UCLA is a better university in the UCLA vs USC race.
...
UCLA vs USC: Ranking.
RankingsUCLAUSC
US News 202113th51st
Qs World Universities Ranking 202240th112nd
National Universities USA20th24th
1 more row
27 Nov 2021

Which is a better college UCLA or USC? ›

According to U.S. News and World Report, UCLA and USC rank 20th and 25th in their list of best national universities, respectively.

Is Temple a good school for law? ›

Temple University (Beasley) is ranked No. 63 in Best Law Schools and No. 7 (tie) in Part-time Law. Schools are ranked according to their performance across a set of widely accepted indicators of excellence.

What CUNY schools offer criminal justice? ›

CUNY John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

Do any Ivy League schools offer criminal justice? ›

1. University of Pennsylvania. The University of Pennsylvania's Department of Criminology offers the nation's only Ivy league and best undergraduate criminology degrees in the country.

What GPA do you need for Temple? ›

We're looking for students who are serious about academics, with at least a B average in high school classes and in the GPA 3.0 range for college-prep courses. The average high school GPA for the fall 2022 incoming class was 3.42​.

How hard is LSAT? ›

The fact is the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is extremely difficult. It's designed to predict how well the brightest students across the world will fare in law school. In other words, just because you have a 4.0 grade point average from a top tier university doesn't mean you're a lock to score high on the test.

What major is closest to criminal justice? ›

Here are some options you may have:
  • Forensic science major. ...
  • Police science major. ...
  • Pre-law and legal major. ...
  • Criminal justice major. ...
  • Sociology major. ...
  • Criminal psychology major. ...
  • Law enforcement administration major. ...
  • Rehabilitation services major. A rehabilitation major includes studying aspects of sociology.

What are the three major schools of criminology? ›

There were three main schools of thought in early criminological theory, spanning the period from the mid-18th century to the mid-twentieth century: Classical, Positivist, and Chicago.

Is college worth it for criminal justice? ›

So, is a criminal justice degree worth it? With the prospect of advanced career opportunities, valuable and versatile skill sets, and a competitive edge in the field, the answer is yes. Obtaining a criminal justice education can position you for long-term success and upward mobility in the field.

Which Ivy League is best for pre law? ›

#1: Harvard College

Harvard also has several organizations for pre-law students, including the Harvard Law Society and the Harvard College Black Pre-Law Association. You'll also be able to take advantage of Harvard's alumni network at top schools and law firms.

What is the easiest to get into Ivy League? ›

Cornell University

Out of all the Ivy League schools, Cornell has the highest admissions rate: 8.7%. For reference, you should be aware that 84.2% of Cornell matriculants were in the top 10% of their graduating class and 96.4% of Cornell matriculants were in the top 25% of their graduating class.

What GPA do you need to get into Harvard? ›

It is tough to get into Harvard. The university receives applications from more qualified applicants than they can accept, and most applicants have at least a 4.18GPA. Meeting GPA and SAT/ACT requirements (although these are now optional) will help you get through the first round of filters.

Is Temple difficult to get into? ›

Temple University admissions is selective with an acceptance rate of 72% and an early acceptance rate of 85.3%. Half the applicants admitted to Temple University have an SAT score between 1110 and 1340 or an ACT score of 24 and 31.

Is Temple a frat school? ›

Since 1903, the Temple University fraternity and sorority community has been a vibrant part of campus life. Today Temple University's fraternity and sorority community has grown to consist of 34 chapters belonging to four councils, and over 1,800 undergraduate members.

Videos

1. A mental health discovery that could change criminal justice forever | Kim Gorgens | TEDxMileHigh
(TEDx Talks)
2. How America's justice system is rigged against the poor
(Vox)
3. Changing the criminal justice system on behalf of children
(PBS NewsHour)
4. Criminology and Criminal Justice Studies
(Hillsborough Community College (HCCFL) )
5. Most In-Demand Criminal Justice Careers
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6. Coming Events and Present Duties | J. C. Ryle | Audiobook Video
(Aneko Press)
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